New Orleans Architecture Tours

Local History

Women in Colonial Louisiana

For Women’s History Month, I’d like to share with you a paper I wrote for a Colonial Louisiana Class in 2013, about the mark that Louisiana women have made on the landscape. I have made a couple of little notes in the body of this work to reflect some changes since then, which can be found inside parentheses.  Enjoy!! Women in Colonial Louisiana After searching all over the internet, looking for women from the colonial era of Louisiana, one might believe that there simply were not many women here during this time period.  These of course were the days before[…]

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Free People of Color in Architecture (Part 1)

For Black History Month I thought I would learn a little more about contributions made by free people of color in the architecture of New Orleans. I want to share the names of some of the free people of color who built homes around the city. Sure, you might have heard about James Gallier, Henry Howard and Thomas Sully but do you know about the works of Jean-Louis Dolliole, Louis Nelson Fouché or Norbert Soulié?   Colonial Era To start at the beginning, Africans were brought to New Orleans as early as 1719 (a year after the city’s founding).  In[…]

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The Second New Orleans Fire (1794)

On December 8th 1794, the second of two great fires in New Orleans history occurred, starting on Royal Street in the French Quarter. This fire was not as damaging as the first great fire which took place in 1788, and burned down 80% of the city, but was still a major setback in rebuilding the city. In 3 short hours, 212 buildings were destroyed, leaving many people homeless. The Spanish government offered the homeless citizens loans to rebuild, but there was a catch – in order to receive these loans, new construction had to follow certain guidelines required by the[…]

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The French Opera House Fire (1919)

On this day in 1919, the French Opera House burned down. This theater had been located at the corner of Bourbon and Toulouse streets, in the French Quarter. New Orleans was the first city in the United States with its own opera company, which having no formal place to hold shows, would perform in people’s homes, event halls and even tents. In 1792, the Le Theatre St. Pierre was developed at 716 St. Peter Street and only stayed open for 8 years when it was closed for good after breaks in production due to issues of building safety concerns and issues[…]

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