New Orleans Architecture Tours

Landmarks

The Rink Myth Debunked!

Standing on the corner of Washington and Prytania, beneath a yellow barn-shaped building, you’ll hear it. Wild stories about the history of the building. “Right in this spot in 1884, the city of New Orleans opened an ice skating rink.” “For two years, this building was an ice skating rink, then it became a mortuary.” “Ice was imported from the North, so guests could skate.” The guides’ stories are varied and incredibly detailed. Some go as far as to discuss the technology of creating an ice rink in this era. The first ice rink was opened in London in 1876[…]

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Favorite Building Friday!

Favorite Building Friday! This week to celebrate our annual French Quarter Fest, we headed back down to New Orleans’ most famous neighborhood to pick out a new house to showcase on our Favorite Building Friday segment. Away from the hustle and bustle of Bourbon Street, tucked away at 707 Dumaine Street is the de La Torre House. The de la Torre House doesn’t make many Favorite New Orleans Houses Lists and I’m willing to bet dollars to donuts that most visitors to the city don’t even notice this home, they just walk past it on their way to Bourbon Street.[…]

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Favorite Building Friday – Carrollton Courthouse

For this week’s Favorite Building Friday, we are heading uptown to talk about the Carrollton Courthouse. Located at the top of the St. Charles Streetcar line is Carrollton, a lovely and mostly residential neighborhood situated in a bend of the Mississippi River and extends to the Jefferson Parish Line.  This area was originally part of Bienville’s property upon the founding of New Orleans, and as time went on it was subdivided and sold. By the early 1800’s this property was in the hands of the McCarty Family, who were prosperous sugar planters. In the 1830s, the family sold their property[…]

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Grand Opening of the Union Station (1892)

On this day in 1892, the Union Station opened at the corner of Howard Avenue and North Rampart Streets. The building was designed by Louis Sullivan, an architect that is known for his contributions to the First Chicago School a term used to describe an architectural movement that included the use of steel framework to make buildings stronger and lighter so they could reach soaring heights. The Chicago School invented Skyscrapers! Louis Sullivan was educated at MIT and the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Upon completing school in 1875, he arrived in Chicago- a city in the process of rebuilding[…]

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Women in Colonial Louisiana

For Women’s History Month, I’d like to share with you a paper I wrote for a Colonial Louisiana Class in 2013, about the mark that Louisiana women have made on the landscape. I have made a couple of little notes in the body of this work to reflect some changes since then, which can be found inside parentheses.  Enjoy!! Women in Colonial Louisiana After searching all over the internet, looking for women from the colonial era of Louisiana, one might believe that there simply were not many women here during this time period.  These of course were the days before[…]

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